Posted in local author event

St. Stephen’s Author Fair Featured 9 Awesome Authors

On Saturday, November 16, St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church in Hicksville, New York hosted its third local Author Fair. This year, it featured keynote speaker and author, Roland Allnach, President of the Long Island Author’s Group, and eight other authors including myself. Roland spoke about the experience of being a local author and how the community can support them.

The authors spoke in three groups. Mystery authors, Debbie De Louise, James J. Cudney IV, and Catherine Maiorisi took turns at the podium sharing their writing and reading some excerpts from their books. After the three mystery authors spoke, there was time for a Q & A session with the audience and then a break where attendees could visit author tables, purchase books and raffle tickets, and help themselves to free refreshments.

The second set of authors included romance author, Nika Rhone; Young Adult author, Tracy Auerbach; and dark fiction author, Lisa Diaz Meyer. After these author’s spoke, there was another question and answer period along with a break.

The final two authors were non-fiction writers who both spoke on religious topics, Dr. John Krahn and Janet Rudolph. Dr. Krahn, also a pastor, had lectured many times at St. Stephens.

After the final questions from the audience and the last break, the authors posed for a group photo, and raffles were drawn for the books that the authors donated.

Posted in local author event

Come to the St. Stephen’s Fall Author Fair – Saturday, November 16, from 2 to 5 pm

On Saturday, November 16, I’ll be hosting the Fall Author Fair at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church in Hicksville on Long Island from 2 to 5 p.m. The President of the Long Island Authors Group, Roland Allnach, will be a speaker, and there will be eight authors of various genres signing books at tables. In addition, each author will talk about their writing, and there will be raffles for prizes. Admission is free, and raffle proceeds will be donated to Literacy Nassau and the church. It should be a fun day and a great opportunity to purchase some autographed books for yourself or as gifts for the upcoming holiday season. If you’re in the area, I hope you will drop by.

Here are some short bios of the authors:

Roland Allnach

Roland Allnach is a multi-award winning author of the strange and surreal. A lifetime Long Island resident, he has published numerous short stories, seven books, and is currently the president of Long Island Authors Group. He also developed the LIAG Traveling Bookstore to display the books of local authors at town fairs and has fostered an energetic expansion of the group. He has appeared on national and local television, Internet and terrestrial radio, and local libraries. His creative influences stem from classical literature, mythology, history, and his years of night shift hospital experience. For more, visit www.rolandallnach.com

Debbie De Louise

Debbie De Louise is an award-winning author and a reference librarian at a public library on Long Island. She is a member of Sisters-in-Crime, International Thriller Writers, Long Island Authors Group, and the Cat Writers’ Association. She’s the author of seven novels including the four books of her Cobble Cove cozy mystery series and her latest psychological mystery, Sea Scope. She lives on Long Island with her husband, daughter, and three cats.

Lisa Diaz Meyer

ALL ROADS HOME, ALL ROADS DESTINED and ALL ROADS SHATTERED are Long Island author, Lisa Diaz Meyer’s current works of multi-genre, dark fiction short stories, poems and plays. The author, poet, playwright uses several controversial topics and awarenesses in her collection of speculative fiction. She has received 5 Star Reviews for all three of her books from Readers Favorite and Literary Titan, including Literary Titan’s Gold Book Award for each as well as Independent Press’ Distinguished Favorite. For her book ALL ROADS DESTINED, she was nominated for a 2017 CIPA EVVY award and also received a New Apple Official Selection in Poetry 2017. ALL ROADS SHATTERED received the New Apple Literary Solo Medalist Award in Short Story Fiction She hails from Nassau County’s south shore.

James J. Cudney, IV

James is my given name; most call me Jay. I grew up on Long Island and currently live in New York City, but I spend lots of time with family in Bethpage. By day, I work in technology. I began writing in 2016 and have two stand-alone family drama novels and a mystery series about Braxton Campus murders. I run a blog and read several books each week. Literature and chatting with fellow book lovers is my world.

Tracy Auerbach

Tracy Auerbach studied English and film in college, and education in graduate school. Some of her college poetry was published in the “Penn Review” (The University of Pennsylvania’s premier literary magazine). She went on to teach and write S.T.E.M. (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) curriculum for the New York Department of Education. Tracy’s work is featured in the online literary journal “Micro-horror,” and “The Writing Disorder” fiction anthology. Her first novel, “The Human Cure,” was published in paperback in 2014. “The Sin Soldiers,” the first book in her YA Sci-fi “Fragments” trilogy, was released this summer from Parliament House Press. When she is not teaching or writing, Tracy is usually reading or playing with her own children. She lives in New York with her husband and two sons.

Nika Rhone

Nika Rhone spent her childhood wearing out library cards as she read her way through the extraordinary worlds far beyond her small hometown on Long Island, NY. By her teens, her imagination was taking her places all on its own, forcing her to learn how to type (badly) so she could get all the stories down on paper. After a long love affair with science fiction and fantasy, she finally discovered romance, fell head-over-heels, and now spends her days crafting happily-ever-afters for the characters who still tell their stories faster (and better) than she can type them.

Catherine Maiorisi

Catherine Maiorisi is the author of the NYPD Detective Chiara Corelli mystery series featuring Corelli and her reluctant partner, Detective P.J. Parker, two tough women who fight each other and the blue wall, while solving high profile murders. The first, A Matter of Blood, a 2019 Lambda Literary Award Finalist, was followed by The Blood Runs Cold. The third, A Message in Blood, is coming in 2020. Catherine has also published two romances, Matters of the Heart and No One But You. Her third romance, Ready for Love, will be published in the fall of 2019. Her three mysteries and four romance short stories are available in various anthologies.

Janet Rudolph

Janet Rudolph has written a trilogy of books on the shamanic lessons underpinning Biblical wisdom. This series of books grew out of her 25-year journey-quest to discover and experience shamanic teachings throughout the world. She has studied with many extra-ordinary shamans and has been initiated into two differing traditions. Rudolph combines practical knowledge with research capabilities to unveil secrets that have been hidden for millennia.

Dr. John H. Krahn

Dr. John H. Krahn is the best selling author of a dozen nonfiction books. He is also a sought after speaker and lecturer. His book, From Surviving to Thriving – A Practical Guide to Revitalize Your Church, has sold thousands of copies and has resulted in Dr. Krahn being asked to present workshops on the subject of church revitalization both nationally and internationally. He also is a frequent presenter at local libraries on the topic, “Living a Happier Life at Every Age.” He’s giving his latest book, Great Thoughts and Quotations for Speakers and Writers, away free. Stop by his table to obtain your free copy.

 

Posted in local author event

Meet Me and Other Local Authors This Fall at a Cat Cafe, Coffee House, and Church

If you live on or near Long Island, you might be interested in some of the upcoming author events at which I’ll be participating with other local authors.

My first event, on Saturday, October 19, is at A Kitten Kadoodle. Coffee Cafe  with three other members of the Coffee House Tours from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. If you like books, cats, coffee, and/or refreshments, come on down to see me and three other authors who will be happy to chat with you and autograph a copy of our books.

In November, I’ll be attending two author events. On Saturday, November 2, I will be at Mongo’s Coffee Roastery and Lounge with four other members of the Coffee House Tours from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. If you haven’t been to this coffee house in Syosset yet, you’re missing a wonderful experience. Unlike most coffee houses, Mongo’s is a large space that hosts many literary events and roasts their coffee on the premises. Come see for yourself and treat yourself to a cup of Joe with five authors.

On Saturday, November 16, I’ll be hosting the Local Author Fair at St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church from 2 to 5 p.m. The President of the Long Island Authors Group, Roland Allnach, will be a speaker, and there will be twelve authors of various genres signing books at tables. In addition, each author will talk about their writing, and there will be raffles for prizes. Admission is free, and raffle proceeds will be donated to a local charity. It should be a fun day and a great opportunity to purchase some autographed books for yourself or as gifts for the upcoming holiday season.

I hope you can join me at one or all of these events. Thanks for your support.

Posted in Authors

A Beautiful Day at Long Island’s Local Author Fair

Debbie De Louise at her author’s table at Long Island’s Local Author Fair. Photo by Richard Meyer

On Saturday, April 6, I joined fellow Long Island authors from three writing groups at the Tilles Center on the C.W. Post Campus for the first Long Island’s Local Author Fair. The event was hosted by Long Island Authors Group, Long Island Romance Writers, and Long Island Children’s Writers and Illustrators. Author tables were set up in the Atrium, and author presentations, panels, and readings took place in the Founders and Patriot Lounges.

Roland Allnach, President of the Long Island Authors Group Photo by Lisa Diaz Meyer

The day started with an opening address by Roland Allnach, President of LIAG (Long Island Authors Group). After Roland gave information about his group, Patty Blount from Long Island Romance Writers and Linda Maria Frank from Long Island Children’s Writers and Illustrators each spoke about their associations. The keynote speaker, author Steve Israel, a former Congressman who grew up on Long island, told of his experiences as an author and representative. He compared writing to politics, pointing out several similarities. Regarding rejection, he noted a difference between the two, saying that a writer’s rejection is much more personal than someone running for office. He also gave some humorous but true anecdotes about participating in book fairs that the authors who were present were able to identify with.

Debbie De Louise speaking in the Founders Lounge about her mysteries. Photo by Lisa Meyer

After the opening speeches, authors returned to their tables and took turns speaking in the Founder’s Lounge. Some also participated in panels and readings in the Patriot’s Lounge. My turn to talk was at 4:40 p.m. I hadn’t viewed the Founders Lounge before and expected it to be a more formal room. I was surprised and pleased to see that, instead, it was set up with comfortable chairs and provided a casual atmosphere to discuss my writing and books.

For me, attending this event was like a homecoming to Post, my alma mater, where I earned a Bachelors in English and a Masters in Library Science in 1989. It was also where I worked as a Features Editor on the Pioneer, the student newspaper. That’s why I was especially glad to meet Carolyn Schurr Levin, Assistant Journalism Professor at C. W. Post, who dropped by my table to introduce herself. Her students had interviewed Roland Allnach for a story, and she said some would come by to also meet me.

Authors Debbie De Louise, Lisa Diaz Meyer, and Rekha Valliappan Photo by Richard Meyer
Debbie De Louise by her poster at Long Island’s Local Author Fair Photo by Richard Meyer
Debbie De Louise outside the Tilles Center Photo by Lisa Diaz Meyer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was also great to see many familiar faces of fellow LIAG members and those who I’ve met at various local book fairs and author talks. My friend Lisa Diaz Meyer was seated in back of me. We took a few breaks to step outside into the beautiful spring day to view the campus and get some fresh air. This brought back many happy memories of my time at Post.

View across the LIU/Post Campus from outside the Tilles Center Photo by Debbie De Louise
Authors Debbie De Louise and Lisa Diaz Meyer outside the Tilles Center Photo by Richard Meyer
Posted in Authors, Books, local author event

Don’t Miss Long Island’s Local Author Fair

This Saturday, April 6, I’ll be attending Long Island’s Local Author Fair with fellow members of LIAG (Long Island Author’s Group) and other local writing associations. This event will take place at the Tilles Center on the LIU/C.W. Post Campus. Admission is free, and it runs from 3 to 8 pm. There’ll be over 50 authors participating, keynote speaker, Steve Israel, panels, and book signings. I’m looking forward to a great day meeting and chatting with authors and readers. If you’re in the Long Island area, enjoy reading and meeting authors, this is an event you won’t want to miss.

Check out this list of author presentations that feature a wide variety of genres. I’ll be speaking about my Cobble Cove mystery series and other books as well as my upcoming psychological mystery release at 4:39 pm in the Founders Hall. Please come by to see me at that time or at my table any time during the event.

 

Posted in Authors, Monday blogs, Writing

Indie Author Day at the Bellmore Memorial Library

It was my pleasure to attend the Indie Author Day at the Bellmore Memorial Library on Saturday, October 14.  The day consisted of speakers, panelists, and authors who interacted with the local community. There was also publishing workshop videos streaming in the Meeting Room throughout the event.

The morning schedule included presentations by three speakers in the library’s community room outside of which snacks, water, and handouts were provided. The first speaker, Dina Santorelli, author of thriller and suspense novels who earned a degree in Creative Writing from Hofstra University, spoke about her experience as a self-published author and her success with her book, Baby Grand.  Santorelli explained how she made the decision to self-publish after having signed with an agent and attempting to sell her book to a traditional publisher. She chose to go the Indie author route to have more control over the production and marketing of her book. Although she had to invest her own money in cover designers and editors, Santorelli was able to sell 100 copies of her book in the first month after it was released and has currently sold tens of thousands of books. She described some misconceptions about self-publishing and explained how most sales of books today are from Amazon eBooks. She said that social  media, particularly twitter, is of utmost importance to authors for them to be discovered by a world-wide audience.

The second speaker was Ellen Meister, author of Dorothy Parker Drank Here, Farewell Dorothy Parker, and other contemporary works. Meister gave suggestions on how to hook a literary agent. She pointed out the advantages of signing with one and gave an overview of what agents did for authors. She also offered tips on what authors should do before they query an agent including the type of research about the agent they should do and where to find the information. She then described the parts of the query letter and what happens if an agent is interested in an author’s query.

The final speaker of the morning was Jan Kardys, literary agent and founder of the Unicorn Writers Conference whose experience working with a large number of traditional publishing houses allowed her to offer her clients creative and unique opportunities to attract a large publisher. She gave examples of how she helped one of her clients build a platform and a brand for herself. She also stressed the importance of social media especially Facebook and Linkedin. She discussed popular resources for writers to help them locate information about agents and publishers, and she also spoke about the importance of copyrighting one’s work. She recommended meetup groups and networking with other writers.

Following a brief break, the program continued with panels of local authors on topics that included, “Telling Our Stories and Those of Others;” “Writing Fiction,” and “Writing for Children.”

Me with my friend and fellow author, Lisa Diaz Meyer, in Author Alley at the Bellmore Memorial Library

In addition to the speakers and panelists, other authors sold their books at tables on the main floor of the library in “Author’s Alley.” There were also giveaways and raffles, and the community had a chance to speak directly to local authors about their unique experiences whether they self-published, published with a small Indie publisher, or published traditionally with a larger publisher.

Me standing by my poster behind my table at the Indie Author Fair. I enjoyed chatting with readers and other local authors attending the event.

The Reference Librarian who helped organize the Bellmore Library’s first ever Indie Author event was Martha DiVittorio. She did a wonderful job selecting speakers, panelists, and local authors. The event was well attended, informative, and a great success.

Posted in Conference, Monday blogs

A Librarian and Author’s Day at BookExpo America

It started on a clear Friday morning, the 2nd day of June, as I boarded an early train to Penn Station along with my friend and fellow Long Island author, Lisa Diaz Meyer, and her son and husband who were also on their way to BookExpo in New York City. Lisa was exhibiting her three wonderful dark-fiction collections while I was representing my library. Although, as a librarian and author I’d been to other local library and book-related conferences, this was my first time at BEA.

Lisa Diaz Meyer, my friend and fellow Long Island author, at her booth at BookExpo

Walking through the glass doors of the Javitz Center, I noticed the huge signs of publishers and booksellers such as Simon & Schuster, Ingram, Publisher’s Weekly, etc. People in business attire were walking around with coffee cups and conference schedules, their registration badges hanging around their necks identifying them as librarians, authors, editors, and others involved in the book world. Spanning four floors and including conference rooms, stages, and exhibitor booths, most of the action took place on the main level. That’s where Lisa set up her table with the other Indie authors. She had been exhibiting since Wednesday and planned to remain for BookCon which took over on the weekend.

Meeting Michael Connelly, a fellow member of International Thriller Writers, was the highlight of my day.

When I received my badge for the day, I was interested to see that it advertised Michael Connelly. As a librarian, I was familiar with the appeal of his books to thriller lovers. One of my patrons who once received books at home when she was homebound was a particular fan of his, and I always had a hard time keeping up with her request for his titles. When I learned he would be appearing at a booth that afternoon to sign copies of The Late Show, his latest release, I thought of Mrs. Nelson and knew she would love to receive her own autographed copy of this book. I made a point to attend the signing and, although the line was long, I managed to get the book, meet Michael in person, and even have a photo taken with him. It was the highlight of my day.

During BookExpo, I also attended the library programs that previewed upcoming summer and fall titles. At many of these, I was able to receive advanced reader copies of these popular forthcoming books. Since I order the fiction and mystery titles for my public library, I found these sessions very informative and knew they would help me select the most anticipated novels for my community. In addition, since we are starting an adult summer reading program this year, some of the ARC’s and exhibitor giveaways can be used as door prizes for our closing event.

Besides the signing with Michael Connelly, there were two other pleasantly unexpected events that happened to me at BookExpo. The first was discovering the Librarian’s Lounge, an oasis hidden away in the far corner of the main floor. Sponsored by Publishers Weekly and open only to librarians, this wonderful area featured food and refreshments throughout the day along with authors and book signings. In the morning, there were bagels and spreads with coffee; and, later in the day, a sweet treat of ice cream and cookies for tired librarians in need of a pick-me-up from the long day of walking around the conference center. During this afternoon break, several authors were also present to sign copies of their books.

The second nice surprise was the number of cat items for sale. At a conference for book people, I actually should’ve expected this. I picked up a black cat tote and a shirt as souvenirs and nabbed a free copy of a Grumpy Cat book.

At the close of the conference day, toting twice as many bags as I’d entered with, my friends and I headed to Penn Station for the train back to Long Island. Unfortunately, it was rush hour, no taxis were available, and the conference shuttle was nowhere in sight. We ended up walking, and I was glad I’d taken the advice of my co-workers and director and brought along a rolling suitcase and comfortable shoes. The day was still pleasant, one of the best of the season so far, so the trek to the station was an enjoyable end to a great day.