Posted in Books, Monday blogs

Why Most Indie Books Don’t Get Shelf Space in Libraries

A fellow author suggested I write this post to let other Indie authors and those who publish with small presses understand how books are selected for purchase by libraries. The reason I’m qualified to write this is that I’m a librarian at a public library and am in charge of ordering the fiction titles for our collection.

As part of my job, I select books from reviews written in publishing journals. Our library uses Booklist. Other popular professional journals include Publishers Weekly, Library Journal, and Kirkus Reviews. The books reviewed in these journals tend to be from the traditional Big 5 publishers. However, Booklist and Library Journal have both started adding sections devoted to self-published books. Kirkus offers an Indie Review service for a fee. Library Journal offers a database for local authors, Self-e by Biblioboard, that includes free downloads of self-published eBooks. Our library had previewed this database but did not feel it would be useful to our community at this time because we already use Overdrive, a popular library database for free eBooks.

How are print books selected for libraries? At our library, we divide ordering among the reference librarians. Books are primarily chosen through library journals as mentioned above and by patron request. We also order high-demand titles from the New York Times Bestseller List. Orders are placed through Baker & Taylor’s online ordering system. We receive a library discount for the books ordered. Unfortunately, most Indie books are not listed on B & T. For those we can’t obtain through them, we use Amazon.com. Some libraries use Ingram. Ordering budgets are set up for different types of books and materials – fiction, non-fiction, Audio, Video, Periodicals, etc. Depending on a library’s size, these budgets can be small or large. Our library serves a community of 40,000 people. However, not all our residents are library card holders, and we also welcome residents from neighboring libraries.

Even if a library stays within its budget, another factor needed to consider when ordering books is how much room is available on their shelves. Librarians are constantly weeding out damaged, old, or low circulating books to make room for new and bestselling titles. For this reason, they have to be selective. That doesn’t mean libraries don’t order any self-published or small press books. I often have local authors send me or bring in literature about their books. Some offer to donate the book if we place it on our shelves. The problem is that these books, if added to the collection, are rarely borrowed unless they are put on display or reviewed in our staff picks newsletter that is distributed in the library and also posted online. The reason is obvious. Without a name like Patterson, Grisham, Clark, Roberts, etc., a new author doesn’t yet have a following. These authors started out in the discard pile when they began and now some of their books are being reprinted to a larger audience.

So what should an Indie author or one who publishes with an Indie Press do to get their book in libraries? This is a question that I, as a librarian and author, have asked myself. While I’ve managed to have my books purchased by my library (of course, I’m the one in charge of ordering fiction), I haven’t had as much luck with other libraries. A few of the libraries in my county have purchased my books after I’ve made calls to fellow librarians, advertised in my library association’s newsletter, participated in an interview by my local paper, and done some author talks for nearby libraries. Since I haven’t had much success, I can imagine how difficult it would be for those authors who aren’t librarians.

But is having a library buy your book an important goal? Although some of the patrons at my library and also staff members who have heard me talk have purchased autographed copies of my books, most of them just borrow my books. That doesn’t do anything for my sales rating or my royalty checks. If I could get libraries across the country to buy my book, that would be another matter. There are 9,041 public libraries in the United States according to statistics from the American Library Association. This figure was last updated in 2014, so there may be more or less at this time. I wouldn’t mind 9,000 sales. But since many libraries are part of larger systems as my library is, there would be no need for each library to buy a copy when they could interloan or share it among their system libraries. That’s if there’s even a demand for it beyond the library that purchased it.

I figure that the reason libraries don’t purchase many Indie books is the same reason they purchase very few textbooks. According to a Bowker report, 700,000 Indie books were published in 2015. With these figures growing annually, it would be impossible for libraries (and bookstores, too) to keep up with the demand and find room on their shelves for these titles. However, if your book is of local interest, if it’s appeared in your local paper, or been reviewed anywhere (Amazon usually doesn’t count), or if you are a regular patron at your home library, you could give it a shot. It never hurts to try, and you never know, your book might be chosen for your library’s book talk group or staff picks newsletter. At the very least, it might end up shelved between some popular authors or in the local author section if your library has one.

 

Posted in A Stone's Throw, Blog Tour

Have you Entered my Blog Tour Giveaway for $15? Tour Ends March 22

I hope you’ve all been following the stops on my new release book tour  for the first book of the Cobble Cove mystery series, A Stone’s Throw. The tour runs through Wednesday, March 22. Those who enter the rafflecopter giveaway are eligible to win a $15 Amazon gift card and e-copies of my new book.

The tour starts here at the tour host’s blog: Silver Dagger Scriptorium

I am thankful to the following blogs that are part of the tour:

 

Posted in A Stone's Throw, New Releases, Solstice Publishing

The First Cobble Cove Mystery Back in Print with a New Chapter

I’m proud to announce that my first Cobble Cove Mystery, A Stone’s Throw, is back in print with a new chapter and excellent edits.

A Stone’s Throw: the first book in the Cobble Cove mystery series

Welcome to book one of the Cobble Cove cozy mystery series. In this book, you will meet widowed librarian, Alicia, and follow her through the mystery that brings her to Cobble Cove and her meeting with John McKinney, the small town newspaper publisher with whom she becomes romantically involved before realizing that he may play a part in the death of her first husband. This book is a second edition that includes a new chapter and cover.

A Stone’s Throw releases March 8, 2017

By Solstice Publishing 

Universal Purchase Link: myBook.to/Stonesthrow2

Paperback:   myBook.to/stonesthrow2paper

Amazon Purchase Link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XGNXQCS/

Blurb

Widowed librarian Alicia Fairmont needs answers …

After her husband is killed in a hit and run accident, Alicia travels upstate to his hometown of Cobble Cove, New York, hoping to locate his estranged family and shed light on his mysterious past. Anticipating staying only a weekend, her visit is extended when she accepts a job at the town’s library.

Secrets stretch decades into the past… 

Assisted by handsome newspaper publisher and aspiring novelist, John McKinney, Alicia discovers a connection between her absent in-laws and a secret John’s father has kept for over sixty years. But her investigation is interrupted when she receives word her house has burned and arson is suspected, sending her rushing back to Long Island, accompanied by John.

Back in Cobble Cove, cryptic clues are uncovered … 

When Alicia returns, she finds a strange diary, confiscated letters, and a digital audio device containing a recording made the day her husband was killed. Anonymous notes warn Alicia to leave town, but she can’t turn her back on the mystery—or her attraction to John. As the pieces begin to fall into place, evidence points to John’s involvement in her husband’s accident. The past and present threaten to collide, and Alicia confronts her fears…

Has she fallen in love with her husband’s killer?

Book trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bTL6s3a9Y1s 

 Check out myBlog tour for a chance to win $15.

http://silver-dagger-scriptorium.weebly.com/sdsxx-tours/a-stones-throw-book-tour-and-giveaway

About the Author:

Debbie De Louise is an award-winning author and a reference librarian at a public library on Long Island. She is a member of Sisters-in-Crime, International Thriller Writers, and the Cat Writer’s Association. She has a BA in English and an MLS in Library Science from Long Island University. Her three published novels include Cloudy RainbowA Stone’s Throw, and Between a Rock and a Hard Place (Solstice Publishing, 2016) that has been on the Amazon bestseller list for cozy mysteries. Her romantic comedy novella, When Jack Trumps Ace, was published in February 2017. Debbie has also written articles and short stories for several anthologies of various genres. Her third Cobble Cove mystery, Written in Stone, will be published in Spring 2017. She lives on Long Island with her husband, daughter, and two cats.

Social Media Links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/debbie.delouise.author/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Deblibrarian

Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/+DebbieDeLouise

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/debbiedelouise

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/2750133.Debbie_De_Louise

Amazon Author Page: (use whichever one works. If they both do, include them both)

Universal Link: Author.to/DebbieDeLouise or https://www.amazon.com/Debbie-De-Louise/e/B0144ZGXPW/

Website/Blog/Newsletter Sign-Up: https://debbiedelouise.com

Cobble Cove Facebook Chat Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/748912598599469/

Sneaky the Library Cat’s Blog: https://sneakylibrarycat.wordpress.com.

Check out myBlog tour for a chance to win $15. http://silver-dagger-scriptorium.weebly.com/sdsxx-tours/a-stones-throw-book-tour-and-giveaway

Posted in Author Spotlight, Authors, Books, Solstice Publishing

Author Spotlight: Chad McClendon

authorspotlightWelcome to the Literary Library Lounge where I interview fellow authors. Today, I am chatting with  Chad McClendon from Ohio.

chad

limitlesslibrarylounge

Thanks for joining me, Chad.  Please take a seat and make yourself comfortable.

How long have you been published? What titles have you published and with which publisher? Have you self-published any titles? Please give details.

Well, I have been published since October of 2015. My very first publication was a short story entitled “Borris.” It is a Gothic Satire about a Vampire Raccoon who continues to live by targeting stock boys in Grocery stores late at night. I say it is Gothic because it contains classical elements of gothic stories, such as fire, a brooding hero, and castles, to name a few. 

One of my most recent publications is called “Die.xlsx” and is published by Fun Dead Publications, and it is a dark comedy.

I have several other online publications for my short stories & flash fiction tales. To name a few, “Just One More” appears in Bewildering Stories, and is the story of a Campfire Legend come to life (careful, it’s a chiller!) I’m pleased to say that my first poem will be published in The Voices Project in early 2018.

chad2And of course, my first title to appear in a book all my own was Lipstick Trace, published by Solstice Publishing. It is a story of two boys becoming unlikely friends, and falling in love with the same music, women, and in some ways each other.

Congratulations on all those publications.

Tell us a little bit about your books — what genre you write, if you write a series, any upcoming releases or your current work-in-progress. If you have an upcoming release, please specify the release date.

I have a tendency to write horror when it comes to my shorter works, whereas most of my novels tend to be Fantasy or Young Adult. Lipstick Trace is Young Adult, but my next project is called “Natalsa of the Brim”, and it is set to be a series.

Natalsa is about a witch struggling to reveal evil in the world, all the while trying to restore her own robbed powers. It is a tale of romance, adventure, deception, and most importantly, Magic.

Sounds very interesting.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

My goal for the longest time was to simply be published. This was accomplished in 2015. My next goal was to appear in print. This happened with “The Accident” in the “Tales From The Grave” anthology. My next goal was to be published in a book all my own and collect a profit, and this happened in Lipstick Trace in May of 2016!

So, my next writing goal is to appear in the New York Times Bestseller list. This is more a long term project. The goal to get there is to get at least 10,000 people to read my books.

To get to that goal, I am attending Literary Conventions, speaking at Schools, soliciting local Book Stores to see if my work can be sold there.

Excellent. I am also hoping to attract a wider readership. I’ve been querying agents and also speaking where I can, mostly at libraries because I’m a librarian. I’ve also spoken at my local Barnes and Noble and am attending a writer’s conference in May and Book Expo in June.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

With Lipstick Trace, the 20-30 year old crowd. It was originally written 10 years ago, so it would deeply appeal to this demographic, as it contains pop culture references that they would most probably like. However, it is still a book centered around Teenagers going into Young Adulthood, I think they can still get a lot out of it.

Good luck with that.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Collect 100 Rejection letters over the course of 365 days. Let me know if you aren’t published by that time.

I like that suggestion. Persistence is of utmost importance to authors.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

My biggest hurdle, and my most frustrating complaint, was getting rejection after rejection with no exact reason for why it was being rejected other than ‘it’s just not right for us at this time.’ It was a cop-out answer then, and it still is. However, I will say that I learned to seek out opinions on my writing from local author groups, people that weren’t my close friends or family. They gave me unique critiques that was able to get my works to a more publishable state.

Beta readers and objective readers are always a big help to authors.

Have you taken any writing or publishing classes? If so, please provide information about them and if you feel they helped you further your professional skills.

I went to college at Northern Kentucky University for Creative Writing. I took a lot of writing classes. I took the standards Grammar Class, Basic/Advanced College Writing, & Shakespeare. But once those dreadful things were out of the way, I got to take Creative Writing, Novel Writing, Fiction Writing, Gothic Literature & The Arts, so many others.

Writing is like learning to shoot a gun. Anyone can shoot a gun, but that guns gonna work a lot longer if you know how to clean it and keep it functioning right. The classes that provided me the most valuable lessons were Creative Writing & Novel Writing. These were groups that promoted constructive criticism, novel development, how to publish, and things to look out for when finding a publisher. If you’re local to NKU, I advise taking them.

They sound great. I was an English major but haven’t taken too many creative writing courses. However, I did take some online publishing courses from the Gale Courses database through my library. I thought they were very helpful.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

I like playing with my kids, playing League of Legends with my wife, camping, and recently grilling out. It’s been 60 degrees this week, and we’ve grilled out twice so far. I love the smell of smoke and extinguished matches, so naturally this is a good hobby for me.

Family time is important, and it’s also good to enjoy the outdoors in good weather .

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

I like that beautiful flash of creation that comes with the idea of a new novel. It is unlike any other experience in the creative process. You are filled with hope, plotlines, character arcs, and most of all potential. What I dislike least, rather what is most challenging, is finding the dang publisher for the thing. Publishing has gotten easier now that I have a few titles under my belt, but it’s still hard to break through!

I agree that writing is a wonderful creative process. I find marketing the hardest part of it because even when you find a publisher, you still need to find buyers for your book.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc. and include some book cover graphics and author photos if possible.

Website – www.cmcfiction.net

Facebook – www.facebook.com/cmcfiction

Twitter – www.twitter.com/cmc_fiction

Free Download for Lipstick Trace (Valid until March 1st 2017) – http://goo.gl/Z05Ckg

Thanks for the interview, Chad, and best wishes to you on your future books.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Books, New Releases, Solstice Publishing

My February Romance Releases and Mystery Events

February is a busy month for me. On Valentine’s Day,  I am releasing my romance comedy novella, When Jack Trumps Ace, as well as my short historical romance, The Seashell and the Stone. Both will be available on Kindle Unlimited and as Amazon eBooks. The novella will also be available as a paperback through all online sellers.

when-jack-trumps-ace-001-1Jackie Riordan’s in trouble . . . 
 
When her jewel-thief father is caught in the middle of a heist, Jackie makes her getaway to his ex-jail pal’s apartment. a man called Ace, who lives in an upscale neighborhood of Chicago. What she doesn’t count on is falling in love with him and becoming his partner in crime. She also doesn’t expect to compete with Ace’s old flame or deal with his cat Roxie who causes her allergy attacks.
 
All bets are off . . .
 
After Jackie discovers clues left by her father which lead her to a treasure that Ace may have stolen, she contemplates her next move. Should she trust Ace and believe her father gave him the money, or head home to her mother, a religious hypocrite who would have no qualms about ratting out her own daughter to the cops? 
 
Things that sparkle aren’t always Diamonds . . . 
 
whenjacktrumpsaceteasereditedBefore Jackie can decide who the good guys really are, she finds herself atop the Willis Tower carrying her father’s ashes in her pocket and aiding Ace in the largest jewelry heist of his life. Things go terribly wrong, and Jackie’s only choice seems to be to walk away from Ace or face imprisonment. 
Purchase links: eBook: myBook.to/Jackebook
The Seashell and the Stone appears in Cupid’s Arrow.
cupidsarrowanthologyeditedPreparing for her wedding day at Seashells Inn, the Victorian Cape May Inn that has been in her family for generations, Ginny Dixon reads her great-great grandmother’s diary and discovers a secret going back to the 1880’s that may impact her future.
Purchase links: eBook: myBook.to/cupid1ebook
mtwevent
On Monday, February 20 at 3 pm EST, I will be hosting an author hour on Mystery Thriller Week where I will talk about my writing and my Cobble Cove Mystery series. A few of my characters will also be helping me host and giving away prizes in contests. Join me for the event at https://www.facebook.com/events/1022241101214851/
Also, read my guest post that was published on February 5: ttps://mysterythrillerweek.com/2017/02/05/the-librarian-author-by-debbie-delouise/
Posted in Author Spotlight, Authors, Books

Author Spotlight: Women’s Fiction Author J. Schlenker

authorspotlightWelcome to the Literary Library Lounge where I interview fellow authors. Today, I am chatting with  J. Schlenker from Olive Hill, Kentucky.

jschlenker1

limitlesslibrarylounge

Thanks for joining me, Jerri (I hope you don’t mind my using your first name here).  Please take a seat and make yourself comfortable.

How long have you been published? What titles have you published? Please give details.

I don’t mind you calling me by my full first name at all. I’ve been published since December 2015. My three books are Jessica Lost Her Wobble, The Color of Cold and Ice, and  The Missing Butler and Other Life Mysteries (A Collection of Short Stories).  They are all Self-Published.

Congratulations. I have a small publisher, but I admire those who do it themselves.

Tell us a little bit about your books.

jschlenkerIn my short career I would say I write mainly women’s fiction.  I would categorize both “Jessica Lost Her Wobble” and “The Color of Cold and Ice” as women’s fiction, mainly. Both have women going through transitions in their lives. Although, “The Color of Cold and Ice” also has men going through transitional stages. “The Missing Butler and Other Life Mysteries” (A Collection of Short Stories) is a hodgepodge. However, the stories, I think, would appeal to the middle-aged or older woman. Should I say ‘more mature’ woman?

I am currently working on two new books: “The Innkeeper on the Edge of Paris” – A woman leaves her marriage and job in the US and travels to France and stays in an old inn where she has strange dreams and encounters a ghost, and meets a man. “Sally”  – Historical Fiction about a woman I met when I was 8. She was 103 at the time. She was born in 1858 into slavery.

All your books sound interesting. Women’s fiction is a very popular genre.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

I’m not one of those people who put goals out there, but as a writer, I want to write something that I’m happy about, something that causes someone to think, or smile, or cry in a good way.  I would hope to see my books as book club pics and in every library.

Those are excellent goals; and, since I’m a librarian, I like your desire to have your book in libraries. One of my goals is also to touch readers and make them think and feel.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

The mature woman or mature male for that matter.

I think my Cobble Cove mystery series also appeals to mature readers because of the age of the characters. The main ones are 40+, although I’ve tried to introduce college-age characters as well as children into the series recently.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

First off, write what’s in your heart, what you are inspired to write.

I agree with that. Many writers are influenced by what they think the public wants to read. I believe you have to write what you feel or it won’t come across as genuine.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

Finding the right words?  After that, there was beta reading (I’ve lucked out on that one – I’ve found some great people who give me the feedback I need) and editing (the editing takes more time than the writing, on my part. My editor goes through it quickly – I lucked out on finding a good editor, too.). What does that leave? Formatting, getting it ready for publication. I’m self-published. So, I had to figure out to get it out there. I’m technologically impaired. So, up until recently, as I’ve had lots of practice doing this now, the formatting was the hardest. Now, I’m back to finding the right words as being the hardest.

Yes, editing takes a lot more time than writing. I don’t think people realize that until they’ve published a book. The first draft is just that, a draft. You have to mold it into the final product and that takes a lot of work. Beta readers and editors can help, but only you know what you want your work to convey.

Have you taken any writing or publishing classes? If so, please provide information about them and if you feel they helped you further your professional skills.

Yes, and yes, they’ve helped a lot. I belong to several writing groups which is helpful. We use writing prompts and critique each other’s work. I’ve taken around ten online writing classes. They are available through my library. I’ve learned a lot through them. I also met one of my beta readers through one of them.

I think you are referring to the Gale Courses, Jerri, and I believe you took some of the ones I took through my library with Eva Shaw. Gale Courses is a database that is offered nationwide through libraries. They have wonderful writing and publishing classes but also many other courses.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

Art, Yoga, being with my family

Very nice. Your covers definitely show your art talent.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

Making myself write, the self-doubt.

Self-doubt is a biggie for most authors including myself.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc. and include some book cover graphics and author photos if possible.

https://www.facebook.com/J.SchlenkerAuthor/

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14763892.J_Schlenker

https://athursdayschild.wordpress.com/

Thanks so much, Jerri. It was a pleasure having you here and learning more about you and your writing. Best wishes to you.

Posted in Author Spotlight, Authors, Books, New Releases

Author Spotlight: Stephen St. Clair

authorspotlightWelcome to the Literary Library Lounge where I interview fellow authors. Today, I am chatting with Stephen St. Clair from Council Bluffs, Idaho.

sinclairphotoThanks for joining us, Stephen.  Please take a seat and make yourself comfortable.

How long have you been published?

I was first published last September with a short story. I now have a full-length book out.

Congratulations.

Please give details about both your published works.

sinclair1sinclair2Tales from the Wondrous Attic appeared in Realms of Fantastic Stories Vol. 1, and my own title- Kindred Souls: Voyage of the Scotsmen. Both are with Solstice Publishing

Tell us a little bit about your books — what genre you write, if you write a series, any upcoming releases or your current work-in-progress.

So far,  I have written in fantasy and historical romance genres. A sequel is in the works for Kindred Souls: Voyage of the Scotsmen. No date set for release or completion at this point.

Very nice. I believe my short story, The Path to Rainbow Bridge, was also in the same Solstice anthology as yours. I have a mystery series with Solstice, but I also like to write other genres. My short historical romance, The Seashell and the Stone, is being published in February in their Cupid’s Arrow anthology. Two of my Cobble Cove mysteries should also be published in the spring.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

My interests are writing fantastic tales that take people out of their normal, everyday life and puts them in a world that grants them reprieve, dare I say a different adventure outside of their own normal life. I hope to continue to write and gain some sort of positive notoriety for what I write. I want to learn to write better and have a better marketing plan for everything I put out.

I think most readers enjoy immersing themselves in a good book to escape the daily routine. Improving one’s craft and planning marketing strategies are two important parts of being an author. I wish you luck with those goals.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

If I write in a specific genre, I hope to attract new readers to my book. It’s hard for the average reader to step outside of the author-comfort zone. I hope that most people that pick up my book are already into that kind of genre, but if not, I hope they will give my book a chance.

I hear you completely. It’s difficult for new writers to reach an audience initially; but, with persistence and more publications, a good author will eventually attract readers.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Don’t be afraid, learn to craft your stories with passion and a sense of adventure, and try your hand in different genres. you never know what might come from them.

I agree, as I like to experiment with different genres myself. I think it helps one grow as an author.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

I blame April Erwin. She’s the one who got me in touch with Solstice. I also blame my wife, she’s the one who kicked me in the proverbial writing pants and said “You’re not done! You have more stories to tell!” My biggest challenges were staying put long enough to actually write something.

Lol. I think many writers can relate to that. We need motivation from our friends and relatives and belief in ourselves. For me, it was my husband’s suggestion to self-publish my first book and then a patron at the library where I work who continued to ask if I was writing anything else. Had it not been for her and a series of events that followed, I would never have published with two publishers and currently have several short stories and a mystery series.

Have you taken any writing or publishing classes? If so, please provide information about them and if you feel they helped you further your professional skills.

I sat thru two college degrees and wrote paper after paper. Each one having their own praises and put-downs. You learn as you go.

Very true. I also have two degrees, one in English and the other in Library science. I also gained a lot of experience from writing for my college newspaper as well as taking several writing and publishing online classes.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

I like to wood carve/wood burn(pyrography) I like to spend time with my wife and go hiking in the woods in hope of coming across some hidden city or alternate reality or dimension.

That sounds like fun especially the last part.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

I like the most is seeing what I have created. The part I like the least is going over and fixing my errors. It’s a time-consuming monster that sucks the life out of you!

Yes, editing if very time-consuming. It usually takes even longer than the initial writing. I don’t mind it so much. It’s the Promoting and marketing of the book after and before that I think takes up the most time away from writing and that I least enjoy.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc.

stephenstclairwriter@gmail.com

@craftedquill on Twitter

stephenstclairwrit.wixsite.com/craftedquill

stephenstclair.webs.com

stephenstclairwriter.blogspot.com

Thanks so much for the interview and reciprocating by having me on your website and Facebook page. I wish you the best in your future writing endeavors.