Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Cozy Mystery

Author Interview of Victoria Gilbert, Author of Shelved Under Murder, A Blue Ridge Library Mystery

I’m pleased to have author Victoria Gilbert from North Carolina here to speak about her writing and new release, Shelved Under Murder, that is on blog tour with Escape with Dollycas into a Good Book.

Welcome, Victoria. Please tell us how long you’ve been published and what titles and/or series you write.

My first book, CROWN OF ICE, written as Vicki L. Weavil, was published in Sept. 2014. It is a fantasy – actually a fairytale retelling of H. C. Andersen’s The Snow Queen. I republished that title, as well as its companion title, SCEPTER OF FIRE – a “mash-up” retelling of Andersen’s The Ugly Duckling and The Steadfast Tin Soldier – as books one and two in the Mirror of Immortality Series in the spring of 2017 with my self-publishing co-op, Snowy Wings Publishing.

I also had a YA scifi – FACSIMILE, written as Vicki L. Weavil — that was published in 2016, but that book is currently out-of-print.

My first mystery, which was written as Victoria Gilbert, is A MURDER FOR THE BOOKS. It was published in December 2017 by Crooked Lane Books.

Very nice. It’s great that you’re experienced writing different genres.

Tell us a little bit about your books — if you write a series, any upcoming releases or your current work-in-progress. If you have an upcoming release, please specify the release date.

The Blue Ridge Library Mystery series is a three-book series. (It may include additional books, but I’m waiting to hear about that).

Book One, A MURDER FOR THE BOOKS, was published in hardback and eBook by Crooked Lane Books on December 12, 2017. The audiobook version from Tantor Media released in April, and the paperback edition was published by Crooked Lane on June 12th.

Book Two, SHELVED UNDER MURDER, was published in hardback and eBook by Crooked Lane – along with the audiobook from Tantor – on July 10th. The paperback edition will release in Jan. 2019.

Book Three, PAST DUE FOR MURDER, will be published in hardback and eBook by Crooked Lane in Feb. 2019, along with its accompanying audiobook from Tantor. There will also be a paperback edition that will be published later.

These sound like great books. As a librarian and also an author of a series featuring a librarian, I think I’d enjoy reading these.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

I simply want to keep writing until the day I die. Hopefully that will include publication of all the books I write! Over the next few years I hope to develop, write, and publish additional cozy and/or light mysteries, as well as to continue my current series (if my publisher requests more books). To accomplish that goal, I plan to write at least two books a year, work on enhancing my promotional efforts, attend pertinent conferences and conventions, and keep improving my craft.

Those are great goals. I’d love to meet you at a conference one day.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

As I am a very eclectic reader myself, I would be happy to attract anyone who enjoys reading.

As far as who might be most interested in my books, I would say anyone who likes cozy or light mysteries, anyone interested in a small-town setting in a mystery, anyone who enjoys some (clean) romance in their books, and anyone who likes historical mysteries mixed in with contemporary crime-solving.

Now I’m sure I’d be interested in your books.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Experiment and try new things, especially if you are feeling “stuck” or unfulfilled with where you are now. I started out in one genre, and while I did get published in that genre, I discovered that my real strengths as a writer lay elsewhere. Experimenting with writing mysteries, a genre I always loved but wasn’t certain I could write successfully, opened up a new world to me. I learned that my style and interests fit the mystery genre – something I would never have known if I hadn’t attempted to write in a new and different genre.

That’s a great tip.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

To be honest, I faced more challenges AFTER being first published than before. I really don’t wish to go into details about that, but I will say that all my experiences have taught me a great deal about the publishing business, which I think is always beneficial.

I feel the same. You learn so much after you publish. It’s like on-the-job training compared to going to school.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

I am a member of Sisters in Crime, International Thriller Writers, and Mystery Writers of America. I am also involved in my local Sisters in Crime chapter, Murder We Write.

You belong to most of my own groups except for Mystery Writers of America and the Murder We Write chapter of Sisters in Crime. I joined the Guppie chapter because I don’t have an agent or large publisher yet. I may look into the Murder We Write chapter, too, if I’m eligible to be a member.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

I love reading, of course. I also enjoy gardening, walking, traveling, drawing and painting, listening to music, attending theatre and dance performances, and watching films.

You have a nice variety of interests that I’m sure also help you with your writing.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

What I like most is the creative process and bringing my characters to life. I also enjoy developing plots and honing my words into something that can make me feel proud. (Even though my writing is never perfect and I am still learning). In addition, I love hearing from readers who have enjoyed my books.

My toughest challenge, and what I like least, is promotion. I am not a natural salesperson so dealing with the marketing aspects of the business are much more of a challenge for me than the creative side.

I think most writers feel the same. I know I do.

What do you like about writing cozy mysteries?

As someone who is not fond of reading books that include graphic violence, language, or sex, I enjoy writing in a genre that doesn’t include those things. I also enjoy being able to focus on characters and everyday life while still being able to include action and adventure. In addition, cozies are fun – something I think we need more of in this world.

I totally agree. As a librarian, even though I need to order books that contain the elements you mentioned, I steer away from them for my own reading because I find they detract from the plot.

Can you share a short excerpt from your latest title or upcoming release?

From: SHELVED UNDER MURDER by Victoria Gilbert:

The rest of the body was revealed as we stepped around the table. Crumpled on her side, with her knees drawn up in a defensive posture, was a middle-aged woman. Her eyes were closed and her thin face partially veiled by locks of curly dark hair. I gripped Richard’s fingers tighter. As my mind attempted to process the scene, I noticed that the fingertips of the artist’s other hand brushed a palette knife that glistened as if it had been soaked in the oil and wiped clean.

The woman lay there so quietly, it was as if she were merely napping. For a moment I could imagine her grasping the knife and rising to her feet to resume work on the canvas sitting on the easel. But the crimson stains blossoming like roses against her white painter’s smock told another story.

Rachel LeBlanc would not finish her latest work. In fact, she would never complete a painting again.

Intriguing excerpt. Thank you.

Is there anything else you’d like our readers to know about you or your books?

I would like them to know that I am happy to engage with readers on social media or via my website contact form and would also love to talk to them if we meet at any conferences, signings, or related events. So readers – don’t hesitate to connect with me!

I’m adding your social media links below to help readers find you and also the rafflecopter link to your blog tour. Thanks again for the interview, and I wish you the best of luck on your new release and future books and series.

Website/blog: http://victoriagilbertmysteries.com/

Facebook author page:  https://www.facebook.com/VictoriaGilbertMysteryAuthor/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/VGilbertauthor

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/VictoriaGilbert

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/victoriagilbertauthor/

Rafflecopter: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/02887792739/?widget_template=56d5f80dbc544fb30fda66f0

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Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Cozy Mystery

Author Spotlight of Paige Sleuth, Author of Murder in the Cards, the first Psychic Poker Pro Mystery

I’m pleased to have author Paige Sleuth (Marla Bradeen) here to speak about her writing and new release, Murder in the Cards: a Psychic Poker Pro Mystery that is on blog tour with Escape with Dollycas Into a Good Book.

Hi, Paige. Please tell us about yourself, where you live, how long you’ve been published, and what titles and/or series you write.

My real name is Marla Bradeen. I have books published under both my name and as Paige Sleuth. Paige is much more ambitious and popular than me, so these days I focus on her works.I live in Las Vegas, Nevada (USA), where it is HOT this time of year. But triple-digit temperatures just give me an extra excuse to stay inside and read! I have written 31 books, all of which are self-published. I published my first book in March 2013, a chick-lit mystery called Lethal Injection. After that, I wrote a handful of other standalone novels that came out over the next two and a half years, all published under my own name. Then, in August 2015, I published my first book as Paige Sleuth. It was a cozy mystery centered around cats called Murder in Cherry Hills. That was my first Cozy Cat Caper Mystery book, and my first attempt at writing a series. At the time, I figured I’d be lucky if I could come up with 12 books. I was positive I’d be completely out of ideas by book 15. I was convinced there would be absolutely no way I would ever make it to 20 books. Fast-forward to 2018, and I now have 22 Cozy Cat Caper Mystery books with no plan to end the series anytime soon.

Wow! That’s quite a publishing record. About your Cozy Cat Caper mysteries, I’m surprised I haven’t heard of them. I’m a big cat mystery fan and also write a cozy series (up to Book 4 right now) that features a library cat, Sneaky. He even has his own blog where he interviews pet characters. I think he’d like to interview one of your cats.

Tell us  more about your books.

The Cozy Cat Caper Mystery series stars Katherine (aka “Kat”) Harper and her two rescue cats, Matty and Tom. Kat somehow always finds herself involved in the latest crime to hit Cherry Hills, Washington, the small town where she lives. Luckily she has Matty and Tom around. Sometimes they help Kat solve the crime, sometimes they help her escape from danger, and sometimes they’re just there for moral support. Kat, Matty, and Tom are like family to me, and I love visiting with them in each new story. But just like with real families, sometimes you need a break from each other. To that end, last year I started brainstorming ideas for another series. That was when I came up with the Psychic Poker Pro Mystery series starring professional poker player Tiffany Swanson. Murder in the Cards is her first book, and although Tiffany only has one adventure to brag about right now, I’m hoping many more are in her future!

Judging from the success of your cat cozy series, I’m sure this will be a long-running one.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

My only real goal is to create stories that are enjoyable and entertaining. I don’t have a publishing schedule, or deadlines, or any type of real marketing plan. I know that makes me a terrible small business owner (which is really what us writers are), but I find all that to be really stressful so I don’t do it. Instead, I tend to work on whatever I feel like working on. I can go months at a time without writing, and some weeks I write every day. I guess you could say my personal goal is to just keep on writing for as long as I enjoy it, and if it ever loses its appeal to find something else I love.

Interesting attitude. I agree with you that the writing business can be quite stressful, so it’s important to enjoy the process.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

Paige Sleuth’s Cozy Cat Caper Mystery series is geared toward cat-loving mystery fans who enjoy light, clean reads. The Psychic Poker Pro Mystery series is actually geared toward the same type of reader, although cats won’t feature as prominently in my new series. But Tiffany is on the verge of realizing that the alley cat named Amber who she’s taken in “temporarily” is about to become a permanent fixture. Both series are intended to be fun and humorous. Kat is a little more serious than Tiffany, and Tiffany is a little more sarcastic than Kat, but I hope readers embrace them both and come to love them as much as I do.

Your books sound like ones I would enjoy. I’ve found that if you like your characters, they will be appealing to readers.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Mainly, keep writing and never give up. Also, find ways to connect with other authors, whether it be on social media or by joining local writers’ groups. Your fellow authors are invaluable sources of advice and support. And you’ll soon find out that most of us struggle with the same things.

That’s very true. I’ve found so much support in the writing community.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

I actually finished my first book, The Amicable Divorce, in 2004. That one took me two years to write, mostly because I didn’t know what I was doing and had a pesky job that ate up a lot of my time. Back then self-publishing wasn’t really an option unless you planned to sell books out of your car trunk. So I did the typical query route in search of a literary agent. Nothing can kill your motivation more quickly than receiving rejection after rejection or, worse, being flat out ignored. I finally gave up querying in 2006. I still wrote off and on, but I didn’t pick it up seriously again until 2012, when I quit my job and needed something to do. Lucky for me, by then ebooks had taken off, and self-publishing had boomed. If you had told me in 2006 that one day I would be glad I’d never found an agent, I wouldn’t have believed you. But now, looking back, I’m so pleased things worked out the way they did.

My first book, Cloudy Rainbow, was self-published in 2008, but I didn’t do it myself. I used a self-publishing company. I’m actually reprinting that book soon with better edits with my current publisher. Although I no longer self publish, I haven’t given up and am still querying agents because I’d love to be published with a large publisher. Your story is a good example of the theme of my first Cobble Cove mystery that things happen for a reason or don’t happen for a reason, as in your case.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

I do not belong to any writing groups. However, I belong to a lot of author groups on Facebook, and we all share advice and experiences. The author community is one of the best, and one I’m so happy to be a part of.

Yes, social media has done a great deal for authors.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

Well, my number one hobby would be reading. I could read all day, every day if given the chance. But I’ve been told it’s good to get out of the house every now and then, so, like Tiffany, I play poker on occasion. And now that I have a series featuring a poker player, I figure I can write off any losses as business expenses (don’t tell my accountant).

Lol. As a librarian, I’ve always been a big reader, but it’s hard finding the time now that I write.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

I probably enjoy the marketing part the least. Getting the word out about my books is definitely the toughest challenge, especially since I’m not someone who really enjoys going on and on about themselves. Although, writing in general can be pretty painful, and depending on when you ask me I might hate it all. But the absolute best part of being an author, hands down, is interacting with readers. There is nothing better than getting a note from a stranger who has read and loved one of your books. I’ve met some wonderful people through my books, and I treasure their support and friendship.

I feel exactly the same way.

What do you like about writing cozy mysteries?

Most of all, I love the characters in cozy mysteries. They’re often quirky, and it can be a lot of fun to see what they do next. Often they start to take control after I’ve gotten their personalities fleshed out, and watching them mold my stories into something bigger and better than I imagined is a wonderful thing to witness.

That’s true for me, too.

Can you share a short excerpt from your latest title or upcoming release?

I’d love to! Here’s a snippet from Murder in the Cards, when Tiffany first discovers she’s telepathic:I walked out of the bathroom, running smack-dab into the guy from my table who had smiled at me earlier.

“Oomph.” The air rushed out of my lungs as I collided with his hard chest.

He grabbed my arms. “You okay?”

“I’m fine.” I steadied myself. “Sorry about that.”

Now that I’d regained my footing, I expected him to let go. Instead, he kept his palms on my arms, his eyes fixed on mine. My heart sank, and I mentally prayed he wouldn’t ask me out. He was attractive enough, with thick brown hair, blue eyes, and a full, warm smile, but I didn’t get involved with out-of-towners. Too much heartache when they returned home to the wives and girlfriends they had never bothered to mention.

Not that I would have any experience with that.

I was about to wiggle free of his hold, but at that exact moment my skin started tingling and my vision blurred. An image of a man sprawled atop a sea of plush white carpet flashed through my head. The blood-red stains splashed across the front of the man’s torso and staining the carpet around him formed a picture vivid enough to make me gasp. I groped for something steady to lean against as nausea surged through me. Somehow I made it to the wall. I collapsed against it and bit my tongue hard, hoping I didn’t retch.

“Hey, you okay?”

I was vaguely aware of the handsome stranger gripping my elbow as he said the words, but my throat was too tight to respond. My pulse was pounding so hard I could feel it in my temples.

“Let’s get you seated.”

I let him guide me over to a bank of slot machines, then fell into one of the chairs like a sack of potatoes. The image had faded, but the emotions it had stirred up still lingered.

The man took the seat next to me. “You feeling all right?”

I blinked, unsure how to respond. Did I feel all right?

“I can call somebody for you, if you’d like,” he offered. “Or flag down security.” He perked up, clearly buoyed by the possibility of pawning me off on someone else.

Evidently I no longer needed to worry about fending off the guy’s advances.

“I’m okay,” I told him. “I just felt a little woozy there for a second.”

Out came that friendly smile again. “Glad to hear it. You went really pale.”

“I’m not really sure what happened. I had this vision of someone, a guy. He was lying on this white carpet, and there was blood everywhere.” I clamped my mouth shut, not sure what had compelled me to explain myself to a stranger.

The man’s face went slack. “What?”

I shook my head. “It was nothing, just something that popped into my head. I probably saw it on one of the television monitors hanging in the poker room.” Now that I had my bearings back, I was embarrassed I’d even brought it up.

My explanation didn’t seem to offer the man any comfort. He gripped the side of the slot machine and pulled his body to the edge of his seat, his knees grazing my thighs. “What exactly did you see?”

I angled away from him. “Just some guy.”

“Describe him.”

The urgency in his voice took me aback. Although I didn’t care to dwell on this topic any longer, I figured I owed him some explanation after he had been nice enough not to abandon me when I had been on the verge of passing out.

“He had brown hair, kind of like yours,” I began. “And his eyes were the same blue as yours.” When the man sucked air through his teeth, I rushed to add, “Except it wasn’t you.”

“My brother.”

His words came out garbled, and it took me a second to decode what he’d said. When I did, my heart stopped beating. “Your brother?”

The man nodded, his movements rigid and mechanical. “My older brother. Randy. That was his name. He was killed, murdered.”

Thank you. Well written.

Is there anything else you’d like our readers to know about you or your books?

Yes! Right now I’m running a “Buy in July” promotion where $1 from every Paige Sleuth book purchase made in July (excluding ebook purchases of Murder in Cherry Hills) will be donated to the Community Cat Coalition of Clark County (C5). C5 helps to curb the cat overpopulation problem (and therefore the number of cats euthanized) in the Las Vegas area by spay/neutering ferals.

I’m definitely interested in supporting that. I believe strongly in cat causes, and I know many of my followers do.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc. and include some book cover graphics and author photos if possible.

Author Links (for Paige Sleuth):

Website: http://www.marlabradeen.com/ps

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/marlabradeenauthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/marlabradeen

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/14207326.Paige_Sleuth

Amazon: http://amazon.com/author/paigesleuth

I’ll connect with you. Thanks so much for the interview, and best wishes on your new series and blog tour. Here’s a link to your rafflecopter that readers may wish to enter: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/02887792737/?widget_template=56d5f80dbc544fb30fda66f0

 

Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Cozy Mystery

Author Spotlight of Julie Mulhern, Author of Shadow Dancing (The Country Club Murders Book 7)

I’m pleased to have author Julie Mulhern from Kansas City, Missouri here to speak about her writing and new release, Shadow Dancing, that is on blog tour with Escape with Dollycas Into a Good Book.

Hi, Julie. Please tell us how long you’ve been published and what titles and/or series you write.

My first book, The Deep End, released in February, 2015 from Henery Press. The Deep End began the Country Club Murders series. Shadow Dancing, my latest book, is book seven.

I’m also working on a new series, The Poppy Fields Adventures, about a Hollywood IT girl. In the first book, the heroine, Poppy Fields, finds herself pitted against a drug lord.

That sounds like quite an impressive workload.

Tell us a little bit about your new release and its series.

The Country Club Murders are set in Kansas City (write what you know) in the mid-1970s. I picked the 70s because I was more interested in researching history than I was in researching CSI-type things.

Ellison Russell, the heroine, is a widowed artist who is also part of the Country Club set. She was raised at a time when the expectations for girls were simple—grow up, get married, and have children. But, in the 70s, times were changing. As Ellison solves mysteries, she also tackles women’s issues.

I try (Lord, do I try) to include a laugh-out-loud moment in each mystery.

Shadow Dancing, the latest of Ellison’s adventures, it released on June 19th.

What an interesting time period and concept for a mystery. It’s also great that you try to add some humor to your books.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

My goals as a writer are to write the best books I can write and to make a living.

Writing isn’t a static skill—at least not for me. I love learning how I can improve and am a big fan of podcasts on the craft of writing. Also the craft of marketing (that whole making a living goal).

Not easy making a living off your writing these days, but I agree that it’s important to keep improving your skills as a writer and to study marketing, as well.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

I have some younger readers, but most of the people who enjoy the Country Club Murders were alive in the 70s. They enjoy the nostalgia and the humor and they don’t mind a mystery that addresses societal issues.

As for the new series—I’m hoping readers who love Ellison will also love Poppy.

Time periods and characters are big draws for readers.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

I wouldn’t dare give advice to other authors—the path is different for all of us. That said, I’ve seen a lot of talented people, who want to be published, release their books too soon. If you’ve sent out your manuscript to more agents than you can count and none have nibbled, it might be time to take a look at your book not self-publish.

That’s an interesting answer and one that I haven’t had before at an interview but have read in publishing articles.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

When I finished the first book I ever wrote, I thought it was marvelous. It wasn’t.

I thought the second book was even better—only so far as it wasn’t quite as dreadful as the first.

With the third book, I found myself a critique group. I listened (to podcasts and my critique partners) and learned, and made massive changes.

That third book got me an agent but the book didn’t sell, and didn’t sell, and didn’t sell.

While it wasn’t selling, I switched genres and wrote The Deep End.

The rest is history.

Great story that is a lesson in itself for aspiring authors.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

I’m a member of Sisters in Crime and Mystery Writers of America.

I belong to Sisters in Crime, too. It’s a great group for women mystery authors.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

I spent ten years getting up before the crack of dawn to write before I went to work, writing at kids’ soccer practices, writing at night, writing over lunch hours.

Now that I’m a full-time writer, my interest is losing all the pounds I gained over the past decade. I’ve become a dedicated walker, love barre classes, and adore yoga.

That rings a bell with me. I, too, get up very early to write. I still work full-time, though, and try to fit in walking which I feel helps clear my head to write (and also manage my weight).

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

There are days when the words are simply not there. Those are not good days.

That happens to all of us.

What do you like about writing cozy mysteries?

What I love about mystery series is getting to know the characters so well they feel like friends. In the Country Club Murders, Ellison, Grace, Aggie, Frances, Anarchy, and even Max, the Weimaraner who wants to rule the world, all feel like family. Writing a Country Club Murder means spending time (a lot of time) with some of my favorite people.

Yes, characters certainly grow on authors as well as readers.

Is there anything else you’d like our readers to know about you or your books?

I love hearing from readers and the best e-mail I ever received was from a woman who was laughing so hard when she was getting chemo that everyone wanted to know what she was reading. If I’m feeling discouraged, I hold onto the fact that I brightened a very difficult day.

I know exactly what you mean.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc.

Website – www.juliemulhernauthor.com

FB – https://www.facebook.com/juliekmulhern/?ref=hl

Twitter – https://twitter.com/JulieKMulhern

Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8573907.Julie_Mulhern

Thanks so much for the interview, Julie, and I wish you the best on your new book and future publications. I’m also including a link to the rafflecopter that’s part of your blog tour for those who wish to enter your giveaway contest: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/02887792731/?widget_template=56d5f80dbc544fb30fda66f0

Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Cozy Mystery

Author Spotlight of Connie di Marco, Author of Tail of the Dragon: A Zodiac Mystery

I’m pleased to have author Connie di Marco from Los Angeles here to speak about her writing and new release, Tail of the Dragon, that is on blog tour with Escape with Dollycas Into a Good Book.

Hi, Connie. Please tell us how long you’ve been published and what titles and/or series you write.

I write as Connie di Marco (for the Zodiac Mysteries) and as Connie Archer, I’m the author of the Soup Lovers’ Mysteries from Berkeley Prime Crime.

Nice to meet you. How long have you been published? What titles and/or series have you published and with which publisher? Have you self-published any titles? Please give details.

My first series was the Soup Lovers’ Mysteries published by Penguin Random House/Berkley Prime Crime.  The first book, A Spoonful of Murder, was released in August of 2012.  After that, I wrote A Broth of Betrayal, A Roux of Revenge, Ladle to the Grave and A Clue in the Stew.  As you can see, my publisher really liked plays on words.

My second series is the Zodiac Mysteries, published by Midnight Ink (the fiction imprint of Llewellyn Worldwide).  This series began in August of 2016 with the first book, The Madness of Mercury.  This was followed by All Signs Point to Murder and now my recently released Tail of the Dragon

Those all sound great. As someone who enjoys astrology, I think I would find your Zodiac mysteries interesting. Please tell us more about them.

The Zodiac Mysteries, my current series, features Julia Bonatti, a San Francisco astrologer who never thought murder would be part of her practice.  Julia lost her fiancé in a hit and run accident a few years before the start of the series.  Instead of continuing with her career plans, she found solace in the study of astrology and developed a completely different career.  She’s been very successful in building her clientele and she also writes Ask Zodia, an astrological advice column for the Chronicle.  Tail of the Dragon is the third book in the series and will be released on August 8th this year.

In Tail of the Dragon, Julia agrees to go undercover at her client’s law firm.  He needs her help because three people have received death threats and the only common denominator between them is a case long settled — the infamous Bank of San Francisco fire.  Before Julia can solve the mystery, two people are dead and her own life is in danger.

You got me hooked.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

I plan to continue the Zodiac Mysteries.  I think Julia’s world offers a lot of adventures.  I’ve also started working on a police story set in Los Angeles, plus I have several ideas for other traditional mysteries.

Excellent.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

First and foremost, these are mysteries, so I think anyone who enjoys a good story would appreciate the Zodiac Mysteries.  If a reader happens to have an interest in astrology, all the better.  Julia leads a very exciting life and I always try to incorporate lots of thrills and danger in these books.

I think you have a wide audience. There are a lot of people who enjoy astrology, if only for fun. By the way, I’m a Taurus.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Don’t give up.  Keep writing and most importantly, read the writers you most admire.  I believe as writers we learn more from reading the masters in our genre than from reading all the available “how to” books.  I’m not knocking those books at all, they have their place, but the best way to educate yourself as a writer is to learn from the very best and keep writing.

That’s so true.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

Well, I guess the biggest challenge was grappling with the question, “Could I do this?”  Could I write a mystery?  My goal when I started was to write one mystery and (hopefully) get it traditionally published.  I didn’t know anything about self-publishing, so I didn’t think of that at first.  I never anticipated that six years later, or maybe more because I started writing a few years before I was published, that I would have written eight books in two different series.

What a great accomplishment.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

Yes – Sisters in Crime, Mystery Writers of America and International Thriller Writers, all wonderful organizations.  Also, Sisters in Crime includes the Guppies, which stands for the Great Unpublished.  Sisters at the national level (and there are many local chapters all over the country) can offer all sorts of help and guidance in writing and publishing for newbies.

We belong to a few of the same groups. I’m a member of International Thriller Writers and also Sisters in Crime. Even though I’m already published, I also recently joined the Guppies because I’m hoping to publish with a large publisher one day.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

Astrology is certainly an interest of mine, as you can tell by the career path I’ve given my protagonist Julia, but I also enjoy making soups (this came in handy for the Soup Lovers’ Mysteries), sewing and refinishing furniture.  The problem is time, of course.  If I’m busy writing there’s very little time to pursue these other interests.

I can relate to that. I’m a librarian, so it’s easy for me to write about Alicia, the librarian who is the protagonist of my Cobble Cove cozy mystery series.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

It’s really a thrill to create a whole world of characters and to know that these “people” will have a life of their own and many stories to tell.  It’s a wonderful feeling when ideas flow and plots come together.  I guess the toughest challenge is the start of a new book.  I wonder if I can do this again.  I wonder if I can make this book even better.  It feels as if I’m gearing up to climb a mountain, but somehow, one sentence, each word, leads to the next and before I know it, a new story is coming together.

Yes, I’ve had those feelings, too.

What do you like about writing cozy mysteries?

I don’t think in terms of ‘cozy’ or ‘not cozy.’  I just try to write the most interesting story I can come up with.  Call it mystery or thriller, call it crime writing – it’s an area I find fascinating.  What is most fascinating is the psychology of those involved in the crime.  What forces could cause an ordinary person to commit a terrible act?  Was their survival at stake?  Was it a crime of passion?  An act they wish they could undo?  What drives people to do such a thing?  Writing mysteries is an endless study of psychology.

Good point. I agree.

Can you share a short excerpt from your latest title or upcoming release?

Sure, I’d be happy to.  Thank you!

EXCERPT – TAIL OF THE DRAGON – by Connie di Marco

I followed the curve from Sutro Heights down to the Great Highway.  Here, the road runs parallel to Ocean Beach.  Sheets of sand had blown across the highway and formed dunes every so often high enough to block the ocean view.  Waves crashed against the concrete abutment sending salt water spray across my windshield.  I turned east on Ulloa away from the roiling Pacific and spotted Sarah Larkin’s address on the opposite side of the street.  The wind off the ocean picked up, blowing east.  Particles of dust and beach sand hit my face as I climbed out of the car.  Keeping my head down for protection, I hurried across the street. 

I climbed the long stairway to the front doors where a sign indicated 3102-3104.  At least here, in the shelter of the entryway, there was respite from the wind.  I pressed the buzzer to the door on the right.  After a moment, a woman called out.  “Who is it?” 

“Hi.  My name is Julia Bonatti.  I’ve come from Meyers Dade & Schultz.”

The door was quickly yanked open by a woman in her late forties.  Her face was round and slightly puffy.  She wore no makeup and was dressed in a nondescript brown jumper over a black sweatshirt.  Her long hair, streaked with gray, was combed back behind her ears. 

She peered at me.  “For God’s sake.  What now?  I told him I didn’t want anything from him or his damn law firm.”  Her eyes were thin puffy slits. 

“I . . . I’d just like to talk to you about your brother.  I was hoping maybe you could help us in finding his murderer.” 

“His murderer . . . I’d give his murderer a prize if I knew who he was,” she sneered.  She looked me up and down and finally decided she’d talk to me even if it was only because I offered a sounding board for her bitterness.  “Come on in,” she said resignedly.

“I gather you and your brother weren’t close, but I am sorry for your loss.” 

“Don’t be.  Wasn’t a loss.  Believe me.  I haven’t talked to Jack for years.  Since my son died.” 

“Oh, I’m so sorry.  I didn’t know.”  A familiar pain flickered in my chest.  My loss seemed small in comparison. 

“Nicky was sixteen when he died.  He had a drug problem.  He got mixed up with the wrong kids and they were into some heavy stuff.  I was sure if he had one more chance . . . a good chance, he might make it.”  Her voice trailed off.  “I begged Jack for the money.  I never asked him for a thing in my life.  Never.  But I begged for that.” 

“He refused?” 

“Said he didn’t see why he should pay for rehab or counseling.  The other places hadn’t done Nick any good, so what difference did it make?”  She looked at me, her eyes betraying a deep well of pain.  “Jack never really loved anyone in his life.  How could he possibly understand what it’s like to love a child?  I didn’t have anyone else to ask.  My husband was killed in a car accident when Nick was seven. Our parents are dead, and Jack had plenty of money.  Big, successful lawyer . . . but he didn’t give a damn about me or Nick.  Yeah, I hated him.  I still hate his guts.  I don’t care if he’s dead, I only wish he had suffered more.” 

Wonderful. Thanks for sharing.

Is there anything else you’d like our readers to know about you or your books?

I love to hear from readers.  Don’t forget, all writers work in isolation, so it’s important to hear if people enjoy your stories.  I can be reached at the emails listed on my website(s), so please don’t be shy.  All writers love to hear from readers!  After all, that’s why we do this.  We love to entertain.

Isn’t that the truth?

Please list your social media links, website, and blog if you have one.

You can visit my website and blog at http://conniedimarco.com, at Facebook.com/ConniediMarco(Author) and Twitter @AskZodia.

My website and blog for the Soup Lovers’ Mysteries can be found at http://conniearchermysteries.com, Facebook.com/ConnieArcherMysteries and Twitter @SnowflakeVT.

And before I forget, I blog regularly on the 15th of the month at Killer Characters where one of my characters does the talking.

Sounds great. I have my own Cobble Cove character chat group on Facebook where I also feature a character each month.

I’m also including the link to your rafflecopter. Best wishes on your tour and new release. http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/02887792730/?widget_template=56d5f80dbc544fb30fda66f0

Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Mysteries

Author Spotlight of Meg Macy, Author of Bear Witness to Murder

I’m pleased to have author Meg Mims who wites as Meg Macy and is also half of the writing team of D.E. Ireland from Southeastern Michigan here to speak about her new cozy mystery, Bear Witness to Murder, that is currently on tour with Escape with Dollycas into a Good Book.

Welcome, Meg. Please tell us how long you’ve been published and what titles and/or series you write.

I was first published in 2011 with Double Crossing, a western historical mystery, using Meg Mims. Double Crossing won a Spur Award from the Western Writers of America for Best First Book. That book and the sequel, Double or Nothing, are with Prairie Rose Publications. I wrote several holiday romance novellas and self-published them – Santa Paws, Santa Claws, Home for the Holidays (all with rescue dogs and cats); The Key to Love and The Key to Christmas (artist-themed), Winner Takes All and A Holiday Hoax (both western romance), plus several short stories. I co-write the Eliza Doolittle & Henry Higgins mysteries (Wouldn’t It Be Deadly, Move Your Blooming Corpse, Get Me to the Grave On Time, With A Little Bit of Blood) with my college friend Sharon Pisacreta under our D.E. Ireland pseudonym; two books were nominated for Agatha Awards, Best Historical. Right now, I’m writing the Shamelessly Adorable Teddy Bear cozy mysteries for Kensington Books. Bearly Departed debuted in 2017, and the next in that series, Bear Witness to Murder that came out May 29th, 2018.

You’re quite accomplished. Congratulations on the new book. The series sounds delightful. Tell us what you’re working on next.

I’m writing book 3 of my teddy bear mysteries, Have Yourself A Beary Little Murder, coming out late in 2019, as well as working on a new series.

Sounds great.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

I love writing cozy mysteries and my goal is to get two books published in a year or year and a half – I’m not a fast writer, so I’m trying to streamline the process and spend less time on social media. Not easy! I so enjoy sharing funny memes, jokes, and photos with friends every day. It’s like being in a close community, only spread out over the U.S. And writers are often introverts in our own world, so having that contact is important. But I do need to cut down on the time spent on Facebook!

I agree about social media taking up a lot of time. I’m trying to do the same myself to get more writing time; although, as you say, it’s important to stay connected with readers online.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

Readers of cozy mysteries set in small towns with dogs, cats, and quaint shops. People who love and collect teddy bears, tea parties, art lovers, kid lovers – anyone who loves a good story, really.

Your books certainly have wide appeal.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Read, read, read, across genres – good, solid authors – and choose one to outline. The beginning, middle, end, plus the points in between. That will give any would-be writer the structure of a story, but so will Robert McKee’s Story. Know your characters – their flaws and strengths, backstories, etc. But finding your voice is key, and the only way to do that is to keep writing and never give up. Write every day. Discipline yourself to produce, learn how to self-edit and revise, learn to take criticism with grace.

Excellent advice.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

Learning to infuse emotions into my characters was a challenge for me. I spent far more time on research, plot, and especially setting and other details. It takes a lot of rewriting to get everything in a good balance.

That’s a good point. Characters are crucial in most books and especially cozies.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

 I belong to Sisters In Crime (national and local), Novelists, Inc., and a Facebook group of historical authors called Sleuths in Time (my friend and I write as D.E. Ireland) – we share information about our books and research. I’m hoping to start a Facebook group for fans of cozy mysteries set in Michigan or the Great Lakes region, too.

Nice. I’m a Sisters in Crime member, too.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

I’m an artist (watercolor, pen/ink, mixed media) although I haven’t had much time for it over the past five years. I love reading (every day), love visiting tea rooms with friends for lunch (at least once a month), and must exercise (to improve my health) by either walking at the mall or working out at Planet Fitness. I also love Pinterest, relaxing over photos of teacups, flowers, gardens, book nooks, etc. It’s marvelous. I enjoy watching classic movies with a big bowl of popcorn.

Very nice past times and relaxing, I’m sure.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

I have lots of ideas, but getting a detailed outline is a challenge for me. Writing is so much easier when you prepare as much as possible ahead of time. I also think self-promotion is much tougher for authors now, although Kensington is really wonderful about helping spread the word about their cozy mysteries. Still, it seems a “social media” presence is necessary – and I prefer Facebook to Twitter. I share photos on Instagram but keep my author info to a minimum there.

I outline very little myself and I agree that can make things difficult, and I also find promotion challenging. I wish I had a larger publisher like Kensington behind me (still querying), but I know authors today need to promote themselves on social media as you say no matter who they publish with.

What do you like about writing cozy mysteries?

I was an early reader of Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, so the “twist” is important to me. I try hard to incorporate that in my work and hope to surprise readers. I also enjoy creating the quaint setting (and wish I lived in a small town), the “family and friends” community atmosphere, the lack of graphic blood/gore and profanity. I am not a fan of books that utilize all that for shock value, or show violence toward women and children. Just not my cup of tea.

That’s how I feel. I also like to add twists to my mysteries.

Can you share a short excerpt from your latest title or upcoming release?

Of course, I’d love to! Here’s a bit from Chapter 1 of Bear Witness to Murder:

So much had changed in the short time since “Will’s Folly.” That’s what Silver Hollow residents now called the murder of the Silver Bear Shop & Factory’s sales rep, Will Taylor, before Labor Day. Few were sad; Will hadn’t been popular with our workers. Still, others had been affected in the aftermath. Murder was a nasty business. Sales at the shop boomed from all the publicity, good and bad, and visitors to the area tripled. But I wasn’t proud of nearly getting myself killed by sleuthing. I’d learned my lesson.

In record time, the Wentworths had hired a crew to clear out and clean the entire Queen Anne-style house from top to bottom. Then they brought in a massive black walnut sideboard for the front parlor, plus square tables and chintz-covered chairs in a pink, green, and gold rose pattern. They’d installed teacup chandeliers – four in each parlor and two in the library. Crisp linen cloths in pastel pink or green draped the tables with white lace overlays. Place settings in an eclectic array of teacups, saucers, plates, and flatware added to the charm. Gold-framed landscapes of the English countryside and castles hung on the walls.

I had to admit the tea room was an improvement over the dowdy bed-and-breakfast.

“Celia! Stop that,” Elle hissed to her younger daughter, who was dunking a shabby teddy bear’s nose into her full teacup.

“Mom, she spilled all over the tablecloth,” said her older daughter, Cara.

“I’ve got it.” I mopped the liquid with extra napkins. Both girls wore party dresses and hair ribbons, and I recognized Elle’s pale blue dress from a shopping trip we’d taken last spring. “Which of the sandwiches did you like best, girls?”

“The strawberry cream cheese,” Celia sang out.

“I like the peanut butter ones,” Cara said, “but they need more jelly.”

“Jam, not jelly. And no, teddies can’t eat or drink,” Elle said. The girls giggled at the wet smear on Celia’s bear. “Now behave, or we won’t be able to come next year.”

“I’d better get back to work. Of course I’ll bring more scones,” I said when the woman at the next table waved me over. “I hope you’re enjoying the tea party.”

“Yes, indeed. We’re planning on a visit to the new toy and bookstore, too.”

When she turned to speak to her friends, I noted Elle’s discomfort. We were all worried sick for her and my cousin Matt. Bad enough that people ordered books online instead of visiting small bookstores like The Cat’s Cradle. But the competition from Holly Parker’s new toy and bookshop, Through the Looking Glass, would draw customers away and cut into their profits. I knew full well that Matt and Elle were barely surviving.

I glanced at the large corner table where Holly Parker sat with a red-haired woman. Holly and I shared a bitter rivalry long ago in high school; she hadn’t changed her hairstyle, still wearing it straight and long, although her tortoise-shell glasses looked modern. I tried to keep an open mind about her return to Silver Hollow, although I had to wonder why she chose to open a shop two weeks ago in direct competition. That didn’t set well with me or my family.

Holly looked like an ingénue in a white dress with a row of sparkly rhinestones along the neckline. She’d always favored white, from what I recalled, which set off the natural olive hue of her complexion and tanned limbs. A pale pink jacket with silver bling spelling out think pink was draped behind her chair. That reminded me of her extensive collection of Pink Panther memorabilia. Or perhaps “obsession” was more apropos.

To each their own, I supposed.

I wasn’t pleased reading Dave Fox’s Silver Hollow Herald, which quoted Holly as saying “Our shop is already number one in sales here in Silver Hollow.” That seemed a stretch. Maddie had witnessed her double-parking in the middle of Theodore Lane and getting ticketed by the local police for it, over the weekend she’d moved into the former Holly Jolly Christmas shop. That reminded me. I needed to ask about some stray bears.

“Are you both enjoying the party?” I asked. Holly beamed at me.

“Oh, yes! I’m so glad we got tickets. It’s so sweet, seeing all the little kids with their teddy bears. I hope you don’t mind that I passed out a few flyers for my shop.”

Since she’d already done so, I figured it was useless to object. “Gina Lawson,” the red-haired woman said and gave me a firm handshake. “I’m Holly’s shop assistant, marketing guru, and publicity person.”

“Nice to meet you, Gina.” I eyed her short tomato-red pixie haircut, gelled up in a curved ridge, rocker-style, and heart-shaped face. “Sounds like you know your promo stuff. I’ve seen a lot of your social media lately. Tweets and Facebook posts about the new store.”

“Great.”

Gina smiled, a bit slyly I thought, so I addressed Holly. “I should have asked you long before now, but did you happen to come across any of our silver or white teddy bears? Among all the items left behind in the Holly Jolly, I mean.”

Holly looked sorrowful. “No. We tossed broken ornaments, scads of nonworking fairy lights, and empty boxes. It was such a mess cleaning up.”

… My sister Maddie met me at the kitchen doorway and pulled me out of sight beyond the swinging doors. She waved her cell phone in triumph.

“See that red-haired woman? She’s trouble. Mark my words.”

Great excerpt.

Is there anything else you’d like our readers to know about you or your books?

They can all be read out of order, but if you want to learn more about the characters’ growth over the series, start from the beginning. In my teddy bear series, I like to put kids in the books’ beginning, either in the shop or at an event, because teddy bears are important for children – for comfort, companionship, and lifelong friendship.

The books in my Cobble Cove series can also be read as standalones, but it is better if you start with the first one, A Stone’s Throw, because the main characters develop as minor ones are added or leave. I like the idea of the teddy bears in your books. For adults, they bring back special memories of childhood and create a charming theme to your stories.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc.

https://www.facebook.com/MegMacyAuthor/

https://www.facebook.com/DEIrelandAuthor/

https://www.facebook.com/SantaPawsMegMims/

https://twitter.com/megmims

https://twitter.com/DEIrelandAuthor

Thanks so much for the interview, Meg, and best wishes on the blog tour and your new cozy. I’m also including a link to your rafflecopter giveaway for those who wish to enter: http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/02887792721/?widget_template=56d5f80dbc544fb30fda66f0

 

Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Cozy Mystery

Author Spotlight of Erin Johnson, Author of Full Moons and Macaroons, from the Spells & Caramels cozy mystery series

I’m pleased to have author Erin Johnson from Tempe Arizona here to speak about her writing and new release, Full Moons and Macaroons that is on blog tour with Escape with Dollycas into a Good Book.

Welcome, Erin. Please tell us how long you’ve been published and what titles and/or series you write.

I’ve indie published the Spells & Caramels Series which has five books out. They are my first books and I launched the first one in October of last year(2017).

Five books in a year, very nice. Tell us a little bit about them.

Seashells, Spells & Caramels is a cozy witch mystery series filled with baking, magic and murder. There are magical kingdoms hidden within our own world, and Imogen discovers them when she enters an enchanted baking contest. The books follow Imogen and her ragtag group of friends who are quirky, funny and make me wish they were real so I could hang out with them. There’s always a mystery to solve and some big overarching storylines that carry throughout the books, including some fun romances. My next book, Airships, Crypts and Chocolate Chips will be out at the end of June (June 23rd tentatively).

A cozy series about witches, very interesting.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

I plan to keep writing, four books a year for now, though I may adjust that in the future. I hope to start a new cozy witch mystery series at the end of the year and to celebrate wrapping up Seashells, Spells & Caramels fairly soon. Though I may extend the series, I’m thinking the seventh book will be the last for now.

Nice.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

I think anyone who enjoys fantasy will love these, but even those who aren’t big into magic can appreciate the murder mystery and adventure aspects, I think. If you enjoy fun, fast-paced reads, where you come to really care about the characters I think these are for you. Also, I think they’re pretty funny (I make myself laugh) so a sense of humor is good, too.

It sounds like your books have a wide audience.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Just get out there and start learning. Connect with other authors—Twitter has been a great place for me to do that, and I learned so much just even from observing what others were doing. I went the self-publishing route, so if you’re interested in that, I just do whatever Chris Fox says. Haha! But seriously, he’s the best, and I also learned so much from Joanna Penn, and especially love her Creative Penn podcast.

Yes. I don’t self publish, but I’ve heard of Joanna Penn — not Chris Fox. I’ll have to check him out.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

Feeling lost and confused and intimidated by the whole process. It’s been my dream since I was little and I was pretty convinced I couldn’t do it, so that was depressing. That’s why I think connecting with others, and that can just mean learning from them, reading their books and blogs, was so helpful for me. It gave me a path and inspiration from people who were doing what I wanted to be doing.

That’s very true.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

I’m not active in any currently, but that’s something I’d like to change.

I’m sure you’ll find the right group when you’re ready.

What are your hobbies and interests besides writing?

I love animals and have three dogs. I spend time with friends and family, and love B-movies. I teach and do Pilates. Lately I’ve been on a big Youtube kick. I enjoy going on there to learn random new things, from organizing a capsule wardrobe to using less plastic.

It’s amazing what can be found on Youtube, right? I also love animals, but I’m more a cat person.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

I just love doing it and running my own business. I have a lot to learn but it’s fun to pour my energy into growing something I love doing. I think my biggest challenge right now is getting myself to spend more time on the business side of writing, in addition to the creative side.

I think that’s a challenge for most authors.

What do you like about writing cozy mysteries?

I love that they always turn out well in the end and that I get to write a fun ensemble of characters. I love the puzzle aspect of solving a cozy and mixing that with magic is just the ideal genre.

I agree. Fun and quirky characters are a big part of cozies.

Can you share a short excerpt from your latest title or upcoming release?

This is from Book 5, Full Moons, Dunes & Macaroons:

After we met the other five Fire bakers, Wool gave us an orientation. Recessed shelves lined one entire white plaster wall. Wool gestured at various bottles, translating the labels for us.

“We’ll cast a translation spell, of course,” he assured Maple, and the little line between her brows relaxed.

She pressed a hand to her chest. “Thank goodness—I was feeling a bit worried I’d use long pepper.” She gestured at one glass jar. “When I meant to use regular black pepper.” She nodded at another.

Wool chuckled. “No worries, Maple.” He placed a hand on her shoulder and guided us on to the next wall. Beside me, Wiley sucked in a deep, loud breath through his nose and blew it out. Again, and again. I gave him a side-eye look.

“You okay there?”

He lifted a brow. “Hm? Oh, yeah.” He sniffed in again as we shuffled past one of the large tiled islands that occupied the center of the kitchen.

“Really? Because you seem like you’re about to hyperventilate and pass out.”

He shook his head and blew out a stream of air with an open mouth. “Nah. Just this breathing technique I’ve been reading about. It’s supposed to help with relaxation.”

“Well, you’re not doing it right, because it’s stressing me out.”

He rolled his eyes, but muttered, “Sorry. It’s just this guy—”

“Wool?”

“Yeah, whatever. It’s like he thinks he knows everything. I’ve been baking for plenty of years, buddy, thank you very much, am I right?”

I lifted a brow and blew my bangs out of my eyes. “I had no idea what any of those spices were.”

Wiley’s eyes fell to his shoes. “Yeah. Me neither.”

Wool pointed out the stove, where they kept the pans and baking sheets in the various black cupboards that matched the black-and-white-patterned floor tiles, and showed us to the recessed ovens that they’d cleared to make room for our flames. I spent a few minutes placing Iggy in one and getting him settled in with a supply of split logs. Wool and Maple moved to a corner to speak more.

Iggy looked past my shoulder toward him. “You think he liked my joke? He smiled and I think he chuckled a little.”

I stacked some logs to the side of the oven and lifted a brow. “Who?”

The little flame rolled his eyes. “Wool, of course. Who else?”

I tugged my lips to the side and tried to suppress my smile. “Well, of course, how silly of me. What joke again?”

Iggy grabbed a log and pulled it closer, absentmindedly munching on the end of it. A tendril of steam rose from the wood. “You know, just a minute ago. Someone mentioned the toasts from last night and I said, ‘I make toasts every morning—for the king’s breakfast. He likes his with butter and grape jelly.’ You didn’t hear?”

I chuckled. “Right, that joke. Hilarious.”

Iggy sniffed. “You’re just jealous that Wool likes me better.”

I opened my mouth in an exaggerated O. “If I didn’t know better, I’d say somebody had a crush.”

Iggy dropped the log and looked offended. “Oh, because I can’t just appreciate a suave and cultured man who appreciates me as a friend? Way to act real insecure Imogen, real insecure.”

I placed the last logs inside the oven and raised my palms. “My apologies. I’ll attempt to be less threatened.”

Great excerpt. Is there anything else you’d like our readers to know about you or your books?

They’re quick and fun and I hope you give them a chance. Let me know what you think!

I hope you get lots of reader feedback.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc. so readers can connect with you.

Website: https://www.erinjohnsonwrites.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EJohnsonWrites/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/EJohnsonWrites

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Erin-Johnson/e/B0767YTMQB

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/ErinJohnsonWrites

Thanks so much for the interview, Erin, and best of luck with your books and blog tour.

Posted in Author Spotlight, Blog Tour, Cozy Mystery

Author Spotlight of Charlie Donlea, Author of Don’t Believe It

I’m pleased to have authorCharlie Donlea here from Chicago, Illinois, to speak about his writing and new novel, Don’t Believe It, which is on blog tour with Escape with Dollycas Into a Good Book.

How long have you been published? What titles and/or series have you published and with which publisher? Have you self-published any titles? Please give details.

I broke into publishing in 2016 with my first novel Summit Lake, and followed with The Girl Who Was Taken the next year. Both novels were international bestsellers. Don’t Believe It is my third novel

All of my books have been published by Kensington Publishing.

Prior to Summit Lake, I wrote three full-length manuscripts that were rejected by more than 100 agents and publishers.  

Impressive. You’re an example of the determination that all writers need to succeed.

Tell us a little bit about your books.

Don’t Believe It will be released late May 2018 and can be pre-ordered now. It follows a true crime documentary filmmaker who produces a hit television series that chronicles the details of a gruesome crime from ten years ago. What starts out as a careful retelling of a haunting story turns into a race for the truth, and some chilling discoveries along the way.

Sounds intriguing.

Describe your goals as a writer. What do you hope to achieve in the next few years? What are you planning to do to reach these goals?

I’ve been on a book-a-year pace for the past three years, with my fourth book due to be released in the summer of 2019. My goal is to keep churning out thrillers at the same pace. I plan to reach that goal by putting my butt in a chair, and my fingers on the keyboard in order to beat my deadlines.

Good plan.

What type of reader are you hoping to attract?  Who do you believe would be most interested in reading your books?

Thriller and suspense readers. Readers who like to read fast-paced stories with great twists, and surprise endings.

Sounds like some of the readers I’d like to reach with my standalone mysteries that are not part of my cozy series.

What advice would you give other authors or those still trying to get published?

Don’t listen to the naysayers. If you concentrate on how difficult it is to break in, you likely won’t. Pick out a few of your favorite (and successful) authors, and study their careers. Remember, before they had any success in publishing they were trying to break in just like you.

For me, that writer is John Grisham. He tells a story of going to a bookstore as an aspiring writer, looking at all the books on the shelves, and wondering what he’d need to do to stand out from all the other writers. I’d say he figured it out pretty well.

Excellent advice. As a librarian, I’m well aware of how long it took many well-known authors to become big names. Your example is inspiring.

What particular challenges and struggles did you face before first becoming published?

Lots of rejection. I wrote three manuscripts that were rejected by more than 100 agents and editors before I broke in.

I’ve been querying two unpublished manuscripts right now and haven’t sent those many out yet but have had my share of rejections.

Do you belong to any writing groups? Which ones?

I belong to Mystery Writers of America and International Thriller Writers.

But as far as writing groups, I’ve always been a solo writer. I have never been part of any critique groups.

I’m also a member of International Thriller Writers as well as Sisters-in-Crime. I’d love to join Mystery Writers of America but am not yet eligible. I agree with you that critique groups aren’t for everyone. Our library has a writer’s group, but it focuses on writing lessons rather than critiques.

What do you like most and least about being an author? What is your toughest challenge?

First drafts are my greatest challenge. And I’m sure my writing deadlines are causing cardiovascular issues.

It’s important to pace yourself, although I know that’s hard to do. I work full-time, so I have to limit my writing time but still write every day.

Please list your social media links, website, blog, etc. so readers can connect with you.

https://www.facebook.com/charliedonlea/

https://twitter.com/CharlieDonlea

https://Charliedonlea.com

Thanks so much for the interview, Charlie, and best wishes on the blog tour and your new release.

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