Posted in Reviews

Two 5-star Reviews for Your Reading Pleasure

*****5-stars

When I read this book, I didn’t realize it was the first by this author. I was drawn to it because of the cover and the fact that I enjoy reading about and have also written a novel featuring a lighthouse. I was more than pleasantly surprised by this story.

After a young woman’s mother dies, her father, a detective, takes her to a small town called Seabrook where he’s been assigned a missing person’s case. His hope is to give her a change of scene and help her heal. What follows is a series of odd events that may remind some readers of a Twilight Zone episode.

Without giving too much away, I will say that I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I could hardly stop reading. There were many surprises, romance, and an interesting ending. And, yes, the lighthouse plays a significant role. If you enjoy paranormal novels with touching characters, I highly recommend this book.

If you’re a lighthouse or mystery fan, you might also enjoy my psychological thriller, Sea Scope (https://books2read.com/u/bQyBgZ), about a murder at a lighthouse. The eBook will shortly be available on several platforms besides Amazon.

*****5-stars

Besides an interesting title, A Flamingo Under the Carousel by William John Rostron is also an interesting book. What makes it unique is the author’s preface to each section and each story in this collection. By providing details on how each published work was inspired and the stories behind the stories, the reader is given a glimpse into the author’s mind and heart.

The book starts with a prologue that explains the title and then includes seven sections and an epilogue. Within the sections are multi-genre stories and essays. Some are new but most have appeared in print elsewhere. Some also feature characters from Rostron’s trilogy (that will soon include a fourth book), Band in the Wind, Sound of Redemption, and Brotherhood of Forever.

There’s something for everyone here along with a list of where each story was previously published. I enjoyed this book and believe it will appeal to a wide audience.

Posted in Anthology, Reviews

Review: The Roaring ’20s: A Decade of Stories edited by JK Larkin

***** 5 stars

The Roaring 20’s: A Decade of Stories is another excellent anthology from the Red Penguin Collection. In this book, eleven authors share tales of various decades. Although I enjoyed every one of these stories and it’s hard to pick favorites, the ones I liked most included David Lange’s “Flapper and the Captain;” “An Act of Senselessness” by Shevaun Cavanaugh Kastl; “Girls Just Want to Have Fun” by Elaine Donadio; and “Time is Here and Gone” by William John Rostron.

Air Force veteran David Lange tells an interesting tale involving a flapper and an air force captain suffering from PTSD after receiving an injury in World War 1. The story’s origin, which is shared by the author at the end, is even more absorbing than this supernatural-type piece. Also with a strong paranormal element is Shevaun Cavanaugh Kastl’s, “An Act of Senselessness” about a couple on Halloween in 1983 that are involved in a car accident with a twist.

“Girls Just Want to Have Fun” by Elaine Donadio is a fun tale featuring wealthy ninety-something Southampton socialite. Miss Ellen, and her younger companion, Patrice. The ladies come to the aid of a girl at a club where they’re dining who is interested in a man but is having trouble gaining his attention. Miss Ellen gives her some old-fashioned pointers that do the trick. Along the way, Ms. Donadio includes interesting tidbits about Long Island history and popular culture of the 1980’s.

“Time is Here and Gone” by William John Rostron, is the last story in this anthology. Last but definitely not least. Mr. Rostron reveals his own family history from 1900-1970 in seven connected short pieces that tell their own stories about his relatives.

The one story I didn’t include among my favorites is my own contribution to this anthology, “Growing Up in the Summer of ’71” which is my own semi-autobiographical tale about an eleven-year-old girl in 1971 with an older sister and how the two deal with relationships during the 1970’s era of Vietnam, hippies, and drugs.

These stories make for a great read any time of year but especially during the holiday season when people often reflect on the past.

Pick up a copy of The Roaring ’20s: A Decade of Stories here: https://amzn.to/3ywEPLI

Posted in Anthology, Reviews

Review of Behind Closed Doors, the New Mystery Anthology in the Red Penguin Collection

*****5 stars

The Red Penguin Collection of anthologies feature short stories of various genres. Their latest, a mystery collection called BEHIND CLOSED DOORS, includes wonderful offerings by 15 talented authors. Although I haven’t read all the stories, my favorites so far are “Last Lap” by Diane Kane (what a twist); “The Time of His LIfe” by William John Rostron (a story every bored young person should read); and, no bias here, my story, “The Return of the Arch Villain,” about a St. Louis cop who reopens the cold case of his wife’s murder before he retires. This is a great collection of mysteries of all types and one any mystery reader won’t want to miss.

Grab your copy here: https://amzn.to/2RW3us4

Read more about the Red Penguin Collection in this blog post: https://debbiedelouise.com/2021/01/18/the-red-penguin-collection-a-great-opportunity-for-writers/